Monthly Archives: August 2016

Learn! Live! Baby!

[to be read, to the pace and tune of… Ice Ice Baby. If that means nothing, please complete this recommended pre-work by clicking here and watching for atleast 30 seconds]

Alright Stop! Collaborate, and Listen!

LPIs back with a another convention

Something, to make your mind shine brightly, Flow like Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi  

Is it any good? You better go!

Interactive workshops, then you’ll know.

MC Don will rock the mic like a vandal. A personalised learning experience so you really get a handle.

Chance, rush to the speaker in that room, Sparking  your thinking with a knowledge boom. 

Ready, to soak up Masie and Wiseman, anything less than the best is not right man!

Live it and learn it, I bet you can’t wait, you better be ready for the second day. 

If there was a problem with OD you’d solve it.

Check out the website with this link that unfolds it.

Ok, ok, I’ll stop. It just felt like a perfectly apt tune that makes me think of Training Zone‘s Jon Kennard – not sure why!?

This September 7th and 8th will be my fourth Learning Live! The annual conference for L+Ders by the Learning and Performance institute, and I’m getting excited. This year I’ll be supporting the backchannel for those of you not able to attend, by brining the event to Twitter, blogs and probably a bit of Periscope.

The thing about putting on a learning event for people who work within learning and development, is that the expectations are high. Your audience are familiar with being the facilitators. Comfortable there infact. I’d make the assumption that they arrive eager to be engaged in learning. You might conclude that makes them the best and/or worst audience. I’d choose the former.

This year the LPI are offering ‘Personal Learning Experience’ with consultation and guidance to support you in embedding the learning in your organisation, and maximising your time at the event. For example if you’re looking at improving your digital offer to engage a national audience you might want to attend Jo Cook‘s session on virtual learning, or hear what VirtualSource Technologies have to offer. I’d like to know who is using an mobile app, how and what for!

The keynotes each year have been excellent, and I’m really looking forward to this years. Elliot Masie is an author, speaker, columnist with masses of L+D experience to share, known for developing learning models to accelerate the spread of knowledge, learning and collaboration throughout organisations. He also publishes a Learning Trends newsletter. I’ve been a Richard Wiseman fan for some time, Professor of the Public Understanding of Psychology. He’s written several pop-Psychology books including Quirkology, and the Act As If Principle. He makes psychology accessible and de-mystifies misconceptions, and I’m all for that! I particularly enjoyed the guided happiness diary concept of his ’59 Seconds’ book. The idea being you only need to spend 59 Seconds attending to something each day to have a impact and shift a habit or thinking pattern. I’m looking forward to hearing what he’s working on now.

Hope to see you there! not too late to book tickets here.

If you can’t make it, we plan to bring the event to you, via the backchannel. Here are the dedicated SoMe team you might wish to follow: @Michael_LPI @kategraham23 @PhilWillocx @ilikelearning2 @Jo_coaches @Amy_Brann @WildfireSpark @s0ngb1rd  Also, the crew behind the LPI and making is happen: Don Taylor (Conference Chairman) – @DonaldHTaylor, Colin Steed (CEO of the LPI) – @ColinSteed, Ed Monk (MD of the LPI) – @EdmundMonk  and the main account @YourLPI

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Open Space II

My favourite people are those with whom I feel an ease and mutuality. Even better when it’s from the off.

Early 2015 part way through my academy journey where lots of my free time was happily spent nose first in articles and books about leadership, and coaching, and emotional intelligence and the like…a valued friend nudged me towards a ‘Coaching and Mentoring Research Day’ at Sheffield Hallam Uni.

He described it: a full day of learning about coaching and mentoring at a different uni to my place of study, with different people, different academics, a different space. And the best bit, it’s fully and completely open-space learning. No lectures. No presentations. Just coaches and postgraduate students in the topic. I booked a place and got excited.

Then as the day got closer, I wondered why I was going and whether I’d have something valuable to contribute. I’m new. There would be people who’ve been doing this for years, and some who have been published.

I was early and first to arrive, so I signed in and met David Megginson. I wasn’t expecting him to be here. My initial thought… ‘you are legendary both on paper and in person, I am so in awe of you’. And yet, his presence and way of being didn’t allow for that traditional educational neck-aching hierarchy (a barrier which I’d been experience on my MA course). He only knew mutuality, and without being able to tell you exactly how, he only allowed me to be mutual too. I use the word allow meaning a mutual giving of permission with every part of your communication without explicit command. When someone looks at you and in to you, and uses your name, doesn’t forget it, and means it.

Open-Space – based on the principles of Owen

The 16 chairs were in a circle. On the wall was a sheet of flip-chart displaying a blank time-table. 3 open spaces, per hour, with lunch in the middle. A pile of post-its and markers lay on the floor in the middle.

Paul Stokes lead us though introductions, and then set the scene.

The time-table is decided by you, now. Take a post-it and pen, and write down a topic or a question that you want to learn about today. Then place it on the time-table wherever you like. As the topic setter you are the Convener. The only commitment being that you show up and start the conversation. You don’t facilitate it, or present it, you just commit to being there to start it.

5 time slots, over 3 rooms, throughout the day = 15 opportunities.

Then, we negotiated. Moving post-its around so we could plan our preferred time-table and not miss the learning sessions we wanted to be part of. Once it was final, we took a photo or jotted it down so we knew what rooms we wanted to go to when.

With open space, when it starts it starts, when it’s over it’s over. Whatever happens is the only thing that could happen, and (my favourite and the most important part) whoever comes are the right people.

The Rules: only one, the law of two feet. If you want to leave a session, you leave.

The Roles: you might chose to be a bumble-bee cross pollinating from group to group, or a butterfly floating around on the periphery… you choose. Tea and coffee are free flowing.

The richness followed. Meaty, thoughtful, considerate discussions with challenge and curiosity. No echo-chamber. No seeking approval. No stage. No sage. Self-leadership and direction for own learning. Everyone, listened to everyone. It was tangential, and emergent and organic. Thoughts followed paths and opened up ideas and new thinking I didn’t realise was there. It didn’t matter if people agreed, or disagreed. In fact the latter was better. For the first time I felt fully respected, fully valued and fully appreciated as an adult learner. This is what it should be like.

Everyone, listened to everyone.

A space and way of being that honours thinking and values diversity.

I’m still in awe of David Megginson… for all the right reasons: ease, mutuality and brilliance. These open space days have definitely changed my learning and practice and remain my favourite most impactful learning days!

 

On 22nd Sept 2016 multiple @LnDConnect Unconferences will be held across the UK and abroad. They will be open space. I hope you can join us!

Open Space I 

A blog inspired by the #LDInsight chat on Friday 12th August, hosted by the @LnDConnect Twitter account at 8am to 9am… which I’m still thinking about.

Every week there is a different question or statement intended to evoke exploration within Learning and Organisational Development. This week the question was ‘What is your experience of working with people with disabilities in relation to their learning?’

More often than not with the #LDInsight chat question, I have an initial response. Sometimes answering the question in one sentence, and feeling ‘I’m done’ … ‘Answered it’. Sometime I tweet the immediate response, and sometimes I pause and think about it some more. The former approach is my favourite, because it usually means I jump into an hour of open space learning with lots of fansinating people who challenge my thoughts and nudge me (just by there contributions and presence) to explore my intial response and many other seemingly tangential but surprisingly valuable conversations that stem from the main question, lending insight and knowledge, and fuelling curiosity for more! It’s filling and my thinking feels honoured – it has a space, no one is interrupting it.

I’m still thinking about learning disabilities. Understanding my ignorance. Accepting how I’ve experience unwanted emotions in different situations …that were hard to accept and not self-judge. The latter making the physiological reactions even harder to sooth.

There’s a storify but I wanted to share some key insights that I’m still pondering:

  • It occurs to me that Twitter can make me feel disabled
  • Above all be respectful. There’s plenty of information on the internet but that’s no substitute for asking
  • Seek to understand, research, accommodate, don’t underestimate the emotional aspects, don’t ever discount
  • There’s more to hear than just sound

And then this about the Twitter chat:

  • If this isn’t a safe enough space then find or ask (or ask) for a space that is safe enough for you. Discussion is important.

The chat was particularly quiet, and I wonder if that’s because of summer hols, or the topic.
With credit owed to @DavidMcAra @BrunhamLandD @niallgavinuk @ChangeContinumm @ProjectLibero